EU Statistics

This article deals with the history and evolution of the presence of Islam in Europe. According to the German Central Institute Islam Archive (de), the total number of Muslims in Europe in 2007 was about 53 million (7.2%), excluding Turkey. The total number of Muslims in the European Union in 2007 was about 16 million (3.2%).

Current population and its perception

Muslim-majority areas in Europe

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Islam in Europe[1]

  1%-2% (Andorra, Croatia)
  20%-30% (Cyprus)
  30%-40% (Macedonia)
  80%-90% (Albania)
  90%-95% (Kosovo)
  95%-100% (Turkey, Azerbaijan)

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According to the German Central Institute Islam Archive (de), the total number of Muslims in Europe in 2007 was about 53 million, including 16 million in the European Union.[2] Approximately 9 million Turks are living in Europe, excluding the Turkish population of Turkey, which makes up the largest Muslim immigrant community in Europe.[14]

The Muslim population in Europe is extremely diverse with varied histories and origins. Today, the Muslim-majority regions of Europe are Albania, Kosovo, parts of Bosnia and Herzegovina, and some Russian regions in Northern Caucasus and the Volga region. The Muslim-dominated Sandžak of Novi Pazar is divided between Serbia and Montenegro. They consist predominantly of indigenous Europeans of the Muslim faith whose religious tradition dates back several hundred years. The transcontinental countries of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan also are Muslim majority. The Muslim population in Europe is composed primarily of peoples who arrived to the European continent in or after (1945), when France declared itself a country of immigration. Muslim emigration to metropolitan France surged during the Algerian War of Independence. In 1961, West German Government invited first Gastarbeiters. Similar contracts were offered by Switzerland. The Muslim population tends to suffer Islamophobia all over Europe, although the perceptions and views of Muslims may vary.

The UN High Commissioner for Refugees estimated that 70% of the people of Albania [15][16][17] are Muslim, 91% in Kosovo, and 30% of them in Macedonia are Muslim. Bosnia has a Muslim plurality. In transcontinental countries such as Turkey 99%, and 93% in Azerbaijan[18] of the population is Muslim respectively. Muslims also form about one sixth of the population of Montenegro. In Russia, Moscow is home to an estimated 1.5 million Muslims.[19][20][21]

There were no reports on Muslims and Muslim institutions in Greenland[22] until 2011 when news about Wassam Azaqeer made headlines globally.[23] Azaqeer was reported as the only Muslim fasting and praying in Greenland during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan in 2011.[24][25][26]

Projections

According to the Pew Research Center, Europe’s population was 6% Muslim in 2010, and is projected to be 8% Muslim by 2030.[27]

Don Melvin wrote in 2004 that, excluding Russia, Europe’s Muslim population will double by 2020. He also says that almost 85% of Europe’s total population growth in 2005 was due to immigration in general.[20][28] Omer Taspinar predicted in 2001 that the Muslim population of Europe will nearly double by 2015, while the non-Muslim will shrink by 3.5%, if the higher Muslim birth rate persists.[29] In the UK, between 2001 and 2009, the Muslim population increased roughly 10 times faster than the rest of the population.[30]

A 2007 Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) report argued that some Muslim population projections are overestimated.[31] Philip Jenkins of Penn State University estimates that by 2100, Muslims will compose about 25% of Europe’s population. Jenkins states this figure does not take account divergent birthrates amongst Europe’s immigrant Christians.[32] Other analysts are skeptical about the accuracy of the claimed Muslim population growth, stating that because many European countries do not ask a person’s religion on official forms or in censuses, it has been difficult to obtain accurate estimates, and arguing that there has been a decrease in Muslim fertility rates in Morocco, the Netherlands and Turkey.[33] A Pew Research Center study, published in January 2011, forecast an increase of Muslims in European population from 6% in 2010 to 8% in 2030.[34] PEW also found that Muslim fertility rate in Europe would drop from 2.2 in 2010 to 2.0 in 2030. On the other hand, the non-Muslim fertility rate in Europe would increase from 1.5 in 2010 to 1.6 in 2030.[27]

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